All posts by Frances Coleman-Williams

New jewellery shop open!

Exciting news!

As a present, my husband sent me on a silver clay jewellery making course a couple of years ago. I fell in love with the craft and have enjoyed it as a hobby ever since. I’ve been making pieces for family and friends and they’ve been well received so a few months ago I decided to open up an online shop; today this has come to fruition! Click here to be taken straight to it!

In its raw state silver clay is composed of silver, wood pulp and water. Each piece of jewellery is handcrafted; during the drying process the water evaporates and during firing, the wood pulp is burnt off. The pieces are then polished to a beautiful shine.

Each piece is individually handmade and therefore unique. So far, on the website, you will see pendants and charms, I’ve paired the pendants with a suitable length and style chain and the charms come with a link.

Ideal Christmas presents!

You’ll see a variety of styles, from natural leaf imprints to geometric shapes, I think they’ll be something for everyone. I’m happy to take commissions so do contact me to discuss this further.

Do come back as I will add more item regularly!

How did colouring save my life?

This year, 4th-10th October is Occupational Therapy week!

If you’ve heard of Occupational Therapy, you may think about physical health aids such as a commode or guide rails, or maybe basketweaving, but they’re so much more!

The Royal College of Occupational Therapists says:

“Occupational therapists provide practical support to help you do the activities that matter to you. They will consider all of your needs – physical, psychological, social and environmental. Their support can make a real difference giving a renewed sense of purpose, opening up new horizons, and changing the way you feel about the future.”

When mentally ill, you may think you’ll see a psychiatrist or psychologist but the nature of mental illness means a multidisciplinary approach is the best and most successful.

The way that you occupy your time can profoundly impact your mental health. I’ve had contact with occupational therapy during prolonged hospital admissions.

One of the most helpful psychological techniques I’ve used is mindfulness but it can be incredibly difficult, when you mind is sick, to try mindfulness for 10 seconds, let alone a couple of minutes. When most unwell I needed something easier to engage with…

When an occupational therapist first introduced me to colouring, I feared it was a little childish and thought I‘d find it hard to concentrate. But I reserved judgment and gave it a go. I’ve been hooked ever since. Colouring was a simple enough activity, I could engage with it and it enabled me to switch off from my spiralling thoughts. It has a calming effect and therefore reduces symptoms of anxiety without much effort! It can also improve motor skills and vision and also boasts to improve sleep!

Ultimately, mindfulness guides you to be able to focus on your breath but mindful activity can be just as beneficial. Mindful colouring meant I focused my mind; continued practice of mindfulness enables us to remain in the here and now rather than dwelling in the past or worrying about the future.

I was seriously unwell so I had to take medication, work hard in psychotherapy and use a lot of other techniques but colouring was the thing I turned to when I couldn’t muster the strength to do anything else. If I’d used every ounce of energy to get out of bed, showered and dressed, I didn’t have any energy left but I didn’t want to just sit in front of the TV; colouring didn’t require me to use any energy, but it helped keep my mind occupied. It played an important part in me beginning to rebuild my life, 1 tiny step at a time.

Plus, I started to feel quite proud of the results, boosting my self esteem along the way!

How do you choose what to eat?!

TW – Trigger Warning – this post contains discussion about food and anorexic thought processes and may be triggering to people to some people. Please exercise causing if you choose to continue reading.

Many of you will know, I recently fractured my jaw and this has led to a severely restricted diet as I had metal work holding my teeth tightly shut to pull my fragmented mandible into correct alignment. At best during the last 9 weeks I’ve been able to get a teaspoon into my mouth and manage smooth soup, at worst, it’s been smoothies and milkshakes through a straw. Unfortunately, this has led to weight loss and the restriction has triggered some familiar thoughts linked to previous experience of anorexia.

2 days ago, I was given fantastic news, I can now open my mouth fully and I’m able to chew food again! I’ll be having the metal work removed within a few weeks so the end of the ordeal is finally in sight!

The hospital has a Costa and I’d been dreaming of enjoying cake from there for weeks! But…standing in front of the array of cakes I simply could not decide, I realised, I had no idea how to choose! The part of my mind that was looking after my fractured jaw needed to choose something soft and easy to chew (rational wise-mind), the part of my mind controlled by anorexic urges was frantically trying to calculate the calories (automatically) but there was a part of me that simply wanted to choose something I liked!

I’d thought about trying to plan for this moment but I’d not wanted my hopes to be dashed. The recovery of my jaw had not been a smooth road so I thought it was best to protect myself and be prepared for not getting the all clear news.

So, how do I choose?!

I love carrot cake but this one had walnuts in it and I’d been advised to avoid nuts at first. I love chocolate cake but I’d been drinking a lot of chocolate milkshake so I wasn’t too enthusiastic about eating a chocolate cake right now. Some of the cakes looked a little hard for the first thing I was eating (pastry/tiffin/crunchie etc). As I gradually ruled out more and more cakes, the choices were reducing which was helpful…or was I making excuses to avoid calories? As I stood there with the waitress waiting for my order, the pressure was on, anxiety raising in my chest, every fibre in my body wanted to turn and run…

I wanted cake, but at the same time, I didn’t want cake if it was going to be this hard! I wanted to enjoy this experience but it was becoming too stressful!

As I’ve noticed a lapse in symptoms of anorexia, fortunately I’m able to catch myself and make a conscious decision not to go down that route – I really do not want to experience that dark hole ever again! But it’s reminded me of some of the difficulties I thought it would be interesting to write about them so people might understand what it’s like to try and recover from an eating disorder.

I, like most, had a dietitian support me to make changes as I tried to put on weight and break free from anorexia. I was advised to make changes such as increasing portion size and varying the foods I ate. So, for example, I was advised to add a sandwich to the fruit I was eating at lunchtime. Simple enough, right?! But, how do I choose which bread to buy If you’ve not eaten bread for years? Have you seen how many types of bread there are in a supermarket?! Up to this point I‘d chosen food based on calorie content, an anorexic mind then persuades its host that it’s its personal choice to want that specific brand. At my worst, I would visit multiple supermarkets for specific brands of specific foods, it didn’t feel like a choice, it was a compulsion.

Confused in the supermarket

So, trying to recover, standing in the bread aisle:

  • Do I go for the most eye-catching brightly coloured packaging? Sounds weird, but it’s a way of choosing!
  • Do I go for the “moral high ground” and choose organic?
  • Do I want large slices or small slices? Smaller, right? Oh no, hang on, that’s probably a disordered thought… But, why would I go for large slices?!
  • Do I like seeded or granary? Is wholemeal different from wholewheat? How will my gut respond to fibre?
  • Do you want a half loaf, just in case you don’t manage this challenge you don’t want to waste too much? Or should I assume success?
  • How about cost? Is more expensive bread nicer? Should I calculate cost per slice or per portion? I don’t want to get a taste for expensive bread, do I?

As soon as you start comparing breads, it’s all too easy to compare calorie content and bam, easy, decision made. Who’s going to bother going through the palaver of the above when it’s so much easier, simpler and far less anxiety provoking to just pick one up based on calorie content?!

And that was just bread for a sandwich, don’t get me started on the margarine/butter debate or sandwich fillings!!

It’s important to remember people trying to recover from other eating disorders may choose food based on, for example, how comfortable they are to binge/purge or how the food makes them feel when they eat it (emotional eating or eating to avoid boredom). Any eating disorder restricts your ability to choose food based on a) whether you like it and b) whether it has a helpful nutritional content for what you need.

It’s so hard to remember, when in this state, food has no moral value, no food is good or bad, food is fuel with nutritional value and should be consumed without guilt or shame. Recovery is hard when surrounded by modern diet culture that normalises, even endorses, unhealthy restrictive eating habits.

When you’ve been absorbed by an eating disorder, you lose touch of your likes and your dislikes – not only can you not remember them but you don’t think you ever had any, beyond preferring foods with a lower calorie content. “Seriously, I love cucumber and water for lunch, it’s just what I prefer!” Yeah, right!

Fortunately, my current situation has only been for a few weeks so I can remember the foods I like, I will be able to fall back into my healthy habits easily. When you’ve been surrounded by an eating disorder for a long time, many years for most, sometimes decades, the disordered habits can be so ingrained that it’s hard enough to even imagine things could be different and it can feel impossible to go through the process of change.

I’m here to say, change is possible, stepping out is hard but once you’re broken away from food rules and rituals, freedom tastes fantastic!

You are never “good” or “bad” when it comes to food. Food has no moral value. It’s just food.