Tag Archives: introvert

What’s a Spoonie?

The spoon theory is a way of explaining that people With chronic illness or disability have fewer units of energy to do daily tasks and use more energy doing them, than other people.
There are 4 reason why I struggle with energy levels:
1. I’m an introvert in an world built for extroverts, my energy is sapped by other people – this is no one’s fault, just the way it is!
2. I’m a high sensitive person which means I take in the world around me and have to process it in a lot more detail than most people. A mild smell, quiet sound or moderate level of lighting to someone else is overwhelming to me and can lead to a migraine.
3. I have chronic pain in multiple parts of my body. Anyone who’s been in pain, just for a day can testify, it’s draining. Strong painkillers only take the edge of my pain, I am never pain free.
4. I don’t get restorative sleep. Most people go down through different levels of sleep, each of which have their benefits, but I do not reach stage 4 sleep which is where repairing and restoration happen.
I wake up in the morning and I’m exhausted. Unless they find a cure, this will be how it is for the rest of my life so I’ve got to find strategies that work!
Because my body doesn’t function optimally I use a lot of energy just keeping it going.
The spoon theory works like this:
Someone without a chronic illness would wake up with 25-30 or so spoons worth of energy, they use a spoon for their morning routine, a spoon to get to work, a few spoons for their morning at work, they’re replenished by eating lunch, they use a few more spoons in the afternoon and have some spoons spare to enjoy the evening. Even on a tired day, perhaps at the end of the week when they may wake up with less energy, you can see that they have enough to get through the day and don’t really need to think about how they spend their energy.
I, and other people with chronic illnesses and/or difficulties mentioned above, wake up with, maybe, 15 spoons. I use a spoon to get out of bed and dressed, if I need a shower, that’s another spoon used. I may use 4 spoons at work but if it’s been particular busy or the alarms are triggered more often, I might use 6 or 7 spoons and another to get home. If I have to run an errand, that might take 2 or 3 depending on what it is – doing the maths, I could be down to 3 by the evening. Spoonies have to save a spoon for getting to bed so I have 2 precious spoons to use in the evening. It may take me a whole spoon to make dinner, if I have a migraine or pain is particularly bad spoons just disappear from my reserve.
Some, but not all Spoonies are able to borrow spoons from the next day, if, for example, they know they can have a lie in or can take time to rest. This is an incredibly risky strategy as it’s not always straight forward. If I push myself today, using just 1 extra spoon, it can cost me 2-3 from tomorrow.
Spoonies often have to use energy managing their illness, for example, regular physio, taking medication or attending appointments.
Different people use different amounts of energy for the same thing, for example, I find 5 minutes of being with noisy children wipes me out, other people can last longer!
I hope this makes sense, it’s really difficult to explain to people who don’t experience it but I’m trying!
I’m not lazy, I’m not flakey, I’m a Spoonie.
Spoonies have to think more strategically about what they do when in order simply to make it through the day!
I do not feel sorry for myself – that would use more energy! I’d just really like it if people could understand!
For Spoonies out there, feeling at a loss, I have a few tips that help me:

  1. I use a lot of alarms on my phone – this means a) I do not have to use precious spoons trying to remember things and b) it means I remember to do things that help, like take my meds!
  2. I have routines (especially morning and evening) and I stick to them, this uses fewer spoons because there’s no decision making and I have to think less about what I’m doing.
  3. Strategically placed coffee – I’m fortunately that caffeine helps, it doesn’t help everyone but without it, I simple could not drive to work safely (believe my, I’ve tried, not good!) Some people find particular foods make managing energy levels better or worse – I’ve not found this to be the case for me.
  4. It’s ok to say “no” – if people judge you for saying “no” to something that’s going to cost you spoons you don’t have, that’s their problem.
  5. Work out what replenishes your spoons and do it! Although I don’t get refreshing sleep, I need to be in bed, resting for at least 8 hours. A couple of hours lost doesn’t just mean I’m tired the next day, it means I struggle to function, will have to borrow spoons and so the problem continues for many, many days! I also need rest time, down time, time out, me time, call it what you will – I need regular evenings of it!
  6. I write lists so I can plan my energy usage.
  7. If I want to do something I know will use a lot of spoons, I try to prepare by getting more sleep and making sure I know the plan so I can try and pace myself. It doesn’t always work but I do my best!
  8. Make sure you surround yourself with people who try to understand. They can support you to use your limited spoons wisely.

Spoonies do not own the monopoly on tiredness, it’s just a way of explaining the extra considerations we have to give to managing energy levels.

Fake it 'til you make it – does it work?

As a mental health recovery worker, my heart sank when I heard my colleague (who I respect a great deal) use the phrase “fake it ’til you make it” with one of her service users.
This was the worst thing someone once said to me during my recovery journey. I had spent my whole life faking it, and this was what was making me sick. Constantly trying to “fit in”, to be “normal”, meant I’d lost sight of who I really was and it made me more and more unhappy.

I’m an introvert and in a world built for extroverts I feel I constantly have to fake social confidence. When I say I’m an introvert, I mean I’m at the extreme end of the spectrum.
By no means do I want anyone to feel sorry for me. Now I know I’m an introvert and I’m ok with it, I love it! How lucky am I that I don’t NEED other people to recharge my batteries? How great is it that I can amuse myself with a ball of yarn on the sofa for hours without getting bored or needing attention from anyone?
Faking being an extrovert is exhausting. In a room full of people, where background noice makes my ear drums painfully contract and  the ridiculously high watt light bulbs just want to shut my eyes, I smile and nod along to the conversation. I try desperately to drop in some interesting or helpful remark now and again just so someone doesn’t ask me if I’m ok.
No, I’m not ok…faking having a great time when your heart is screaming “get me out of here” takes a lot of self discipline!
If introverts don’t fake it, they’re considered a “party pooper” or “billy-no-mates” or a “hermit”, these are not considered indearing qualities, they’re unfair derogatory insults. The truth is, I just like being on my own, I find peace and quiet restful and other people (except a select few) sap my limited energy. Why is this considered strange?

I felt angry that my colleague had no idea the pain my faking had caused me and I considered her comment insensitive. Add insult to injury she has to be the most extrovert person I know! In my anger I was wondering how she could possibly make such a rookie mistake. But, as I say, I respect her so I knew she meant well and I had to stop and think about what she was trying to say.
The context of her comment was with someone who had mild depression and anxiety. They had previously been an extrovert and were disappointed and frustrated that they’d lost that part of them. My colleague was suggesting that they do the things they knew they’d previously enjoyed. The idea being if you immerse yourself in things, you know, deep down, are part of your character and enjoyable, then, fake a smile now and again, eventually the old you will emerge. My colleague was helping her service user believe in himself again. This genuinely works provided you also address the issues that led to the mental illness occurring in the first place.

Saying this to me, or any introvert, however, would just compound the issues that led to the illness developing. When this comment was said to me, it confirmed that was the failure I felt and unfortunately led me to feel that if I had to fake it for the rest of my life (since I’d been faking it all up until now and I’d never “made it” I wasn’t going to suddenly be able to make it now) there really was no point in going on.
If you tell an introvert to “fake it” to “make it” in the world, instead of building them up, you will be smashing their self esteem to smithereens. We’re already great fakers, what we really need is to be told, “it’s ok to be you”.
For an introvert, finding recovery can be a lot more subtle than for an extrovert. When depressed, the usual reaction is to hide away from the world. Extroverts needs to get out there, find people, build their energy from them. An introvert needs to be truthful about what makes them happy, it might be about treating yourself to some luxuary bath salts or lighting a candle while doing some breathing exercises. I’m not advocating introverts continuing to hide away, we all need someone in our lives, I’m just saying an introvert needs to find balance.

When searching for freedom from a mental illness, it’s about finding out who you really are. If faking being an extrovert will remind you of how fun it is, go for it. If faking being an extrovert will just remind you that you hate faking being an extrovert, please stop!