Tag Archives: covid-19

Question mark

4 essential questions that could literally change your life

No matter where you are in the world, we’ve all been through some sort of lockdown as the Covid-19 pandemic hit and these measures are now being lifted. Are you someone who’s desperate to “get back to normal” or did you appreciate lockdown more than you expected?

There’s no doubt about it (unless you’re a conspiracy theorist) we needed the lockdown measures to keep us physically safe from the virus spreading through the population. Some people found the extended period of rest had a positive impact on their mental health while others struggled with loneliness, isolation and increased anxiety.

Everyone had a unique experience – it’s important to remember that and value it. Whether you found it easy or hard, you can’t compare your experience to the next person’s because their set of experiences, no matter how similar they appeared from the outside, were unique.

My lockdown involved experiencing discrimination at work despite me (unusually) finding my voice to explain what I needed. But because of this, I had to look for the positives! Of course I missed my family and friends but I’m an introvert so I loved having some space to do my own thing and I’ve even developed some new skills!

So this brings me to the 4 important questions:

What did we gain during lockdown that we want to keep?

Woman in yoga pose with candles

I’m not talking about any material thing, it’s more likely to be something you spent time doing. What did you allow yourself to do that you didn’t previously? I started practicing yoga regularly and I couldn’t believe how much it benefitted my mental and physical health.

Strangers were more considerate, communities worked together, our church had to start doing a lot of things differently – this wasn’t such a bad thing! We learnt a lot! We started to appreciate the little things in life – we can’t hold onto some of this…

It would be all too easy to “go back to normal” and lose the good that lockdown brought us. Think about the positives that it brought and try to incorporate them into a new normal.

What did we gain during lockdown that we want to lose?

There may be all sorts of things that unexpectedly occurred that we’re hoping to discard now, this may be easier said than done. Some may have had to work from home and want to return to the office (we may not have a say) or home schooled children may be busting to get back to the classroom!

Young woman in glasses, greyscale photograph

There may be more subtle changes that crept in, that you might not have even noticed at the time. With a lack of fresh air, exercise and variety many struggled with unwelcome insomnia. Perhaps anxiety, low mood or other difficult feelings have been problematic. We all have a preferred coping mechanism when things get tough such as eating more, drinking more or have you found yourself surfing unsavoury websites? Some coping mechanisms may be more accepted by society but that doesn’t mean they’re ok – only you can decide if your behaviour is something you want to change.

What did we lose during lockdown that we want back?

Young child being hugged

Obviously we all lost our freedom and we’re getting this back but what else did you struggle without? Most people will want to hug their friends and family as soon as it’s permitted.

Isn’t it amazing how much more we value something once it’s taken away?! If there’s something you now appreciate more than you did before, make sure you don’t take it for granted again!

What did we lose during lockdown that we don’t want back?

Lockdown was imposed on us but there’s no reason why we can’t take advantage of a bad situation! Something I was very glad to lose was the crowded supermarket! I was very happy to queue outside for a short time if it meant the atmosphere inside was quieter and calmer. (Unfortunately, I have no say over this now and the consideration I used to see has all but disappeared.)

Crowded train station

The planet certainly breathed a sigh of relief as we travelled less, any driving I did as a keyworker was easier with fewer idiot drivers on the road – wouldn’t it be great if we could all learn from this and continue in this vein?!

Perhaps homing working has helped you realise that you hated commuting? Or did our I forced shut-down show you that you were doing too much and you need to cut back on your commitments? Do you need to put yourself first a bit more?

Perhaps lockdown has taken its toll on your mental health, as it has done for 80% of the population. If you need help coming to terms with anything that’s happened, help is available – it’s really important to talk. Some people find talking to friends or family really helpful while others need to talk to a professional.

Rememeber, you are not alone, there’s aways someone who can help.

How a global pandemic can trigger an eating disorder

Everyone is managing a changing world! It’s Mental Health Awareness Week and I’m writing this blog to give insight into the world of eating disorders, not to say “my struggle is worse than yours” but to say, you never know what someone else is going to through – most people have hidden struggles and it’s not always obvious what’s going to trigger someone’s difficulties. Measures imposed by our governments have been vital to keep us safe but at what cost?

Change in routine

A routine for many people can indicate safety. Most of us find a change in routine difficult but someone with an eating disorder, routine can be the difference between them eating enough/regularly each day or turning to disordered behaviours for comfort.

Encouragement to exercise everyday

When in eating disorder recovery, exercise can be difficult to manage. Many struggle with exercise addiction as a way to manage weight and recovery from this may include not exercising or restricting exercise. The UK government’s lockdown rules allowed 1 trip outside each day for exercise. If one of the few things you’re “allowed” to do each day is exercise, it can feel like you’re being told you “should” exercise everyday and this only adds to the battle already going on inside your head about what your should and shouldn’t be doing. How many adults actually exercise everyday?! Not many, but for someone recovering from an eating disorder, this is a minefield!

Supermarket stress

Recovering from an eating disorder can include a strict diet plan. Panic buying lead to limited stock and then restrictions on items we could buy. While to the average family, these restrictions may have been inconvenient and caused them to use alternatives. This may have caused chaos to someone with an eating disorder. If the food item you need is not available, this could have triggered days without food altogether. While the queues at the supermarket are essential to keep numbers within at safe levels, this could cause extremely high levels of stress for someone who already finds the trip anxiety provoking.

Encouraged obsessive actions

While washing our hands is vital to prevent spread of Covid-19, with the UK government telling us to wash our hands often, this can play into the obsessive compulsive mind of someone struggling with an eating disorder prompting further ritualistic behaviours around food.

The wrong type of “vulnerable”

Those most at risk of dying from Covid-19 have been put on a vulnerable list in order to ensure we can keep them safe from catching the virus. This has meant that some support systems are no longer available for other people who usually use them. For example, people who usually use the online supermarket delivery systems haven’t been able to get slots. Going to a supermarket, for some people recovering from an eating disorder, is simply impossible. What do you do if you can’t get a delivery slot, because they’re reserved for other people?

Lack of therapy or online therapy

Therapy is a vital part of eating disorder recovery. Some agencies have completely shut down due to lack of resources. Some, fortunately have been able to continue online. Some people may prefer this and there are benefits, such as not having to travel. However, at times technical hitches can delay sessions and talking through a computer means some subtle communication is lost. I’m not alone in having a violent dislike of seeing myself on screen and a therapists sensitive use of physical touch is completely lost.

While the social distancing and lockdown measures have been vital to keep everyone safe – the repercussions on those with internal mental struggles, I have no doubt, without additional support, will be extremely long lasting.

We should think before “returning to normal”

While I understand some people’s lives have not changed as the government has imposed lockdown, quarantine or social distancing measures because you continue to work on the frontline, many people have been afforded time and space to reflect on a pre and post covid-19 life and I have to say, I’ll be making some careful choices before rushing back to “life as usual” once the lockdown rules art lifted.

Some people’s lives changed over night while others have seen more gradual changes as employers have had to make difficult decisions each week as their income decreased over time; to be furloughed has become common parlance. Some are glad of the rest and try to see the silver lining while others struggle to makes ends meet and don’t know when, how or if things will ever get better. We’ve discovered children don’t need to be examined for them to continue into the next school year and actually, when it comes to it, being happy and healthy is more important than up-to-date book learning.

I’ve needed my GP more in the last month than I have done in the last year. Appointments have been available because, here in the UK, people who don’t need to see a doctor, are heeding the advice to protect the NHS. Surely, when this crisis is over, we should continue protecting the NHS? Why, pre-covid-19 were there people in A&E who didn’t need to be there? Don’t get me wrong, people who are having symptoms of life threatening emergencies, really should call for an ambulance.

I’m more connected to the people who matter in my life than I have been before. I’m not seeing them face-to-face and I want that to change but I’m connecting with some people on a daily (or near daily) basis and I like that.

People’s shopping habits give us food for thought… the initial panic caused by the unknown, when will the next trip be? And will the shelves be stocked next time? Were these actions selfish, greedy or anxiety driven?

Most people are now sharing positive changes in their shopping habits. A reduction in multi-trip shopping because people are reducing waste by using up left overs and making do with what’s in the house. People are finding locally sourced produce such as eggs and meat and having online groceries such as fruit, veg and store cupboard essentials delivered directly to their doors reducing travel. Shopping trips that are happening are less fraught because fewer people are permitted inside the shop at any one time, we’re standing back and giving each other space – surely this should have always been the case?

As soon as people realised they had more time they looked for ways they could help one another. Being community spirited should continue. Why did is take a global pandemic for me to get my neighbour’s as phone number? How come my neighbours didn’t know I played the saxophone until I played in the street as part of the Clap for the NHS on Thursdays? Why did it take such drastic measures for us to start to get to know one another?

I’ve discovered daily yoga, fresh air and being assertiveness are actually good for me. Previously I just thought they might be, since being given time and head space to actually try them, I’ve discovered it’s true! We’re all different, what’s now in your new daily routine that wasn’t before – why would you let that slip just because you wanted to “get back to normal”?

How many of us blindly accepted our daily commute but have miraculously found that it’s not actually necessary? Perhaps remote working has its draw backs but many people have found ways to make it work. A reduction in travel has reduced pollution to levels no one could have imagined. Our planet is breathing a sigh of relief.

Has there been another point in history when we’ve had daily press briefings and held the UK government to account every single day? They’re making the science accessible, answering our questions and they’re being clear about the guidance and why it’s in place.

It’s gutting that it’s taken a deadly virus to do it but mental-wellbeing is being spoken about everyday. It’s not ok that the suicide rate is increasing and no amount of money is going to resource the mental health services sufficiently but let’s keep raising the profile of mental well-being and keep checking on each other. Let’s make it a normal conversation. When you train in CPR, make mental health first aid a priority as well – it always should have been.

Are you longing for your “old life” through rose tinted spectacles? Perhaps you’re miss seeing people face to face, at the moment you’re being told “no” and that naturally makes you want to rebel but don’t make the mistake of thinking everything about “the good old days” was better…

On the 23rd March in the UK and on other dates across the world, we were forced to adopt a new normal by governments announcing lockdown measures to keep us safe. As the measures are gradually lifted, we can choose to adopt a newer, brighter normal as we bring together the best of both the old and the new.

We can choose to hug people when we see them but also stay connected in between. We can choose to shop efficiently, not give into greed, continue to source local produce and ask our neighbours if we can shop for them when we’re going. Where we need to go back to previous ways of living, can we find compromise?

Who would have thought about broadcasting weekly church services on YouTube? Faith communities are reaching beyond their building walls like never before and although returning to gathered fellowship will be cause for massive celebration let’s not lose what we’ve gained from being forced to church technologically. How can we have the best from both worlds?!

For many, there’ll be financial consequences for years to come. There are many who have no choice, they can’t go back to life pre-Covid-19 due to bereavement, redundancy or other life event. Are there choices we can make as we find our new normal that will benefit anyone less fortunate than ourselves?

If everything about your old life suits you better and that’s what you want to return to and you can, that’s your call but I just ask that you make an active decision and don’t just go back to it mindlessly without thinking carefully about the true implications.